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Reviving the classics: Madame Bovary

Madame Bovary is a timeless classic from Gustave Flaubert. Published in French in 1856, this book was banned for immorality. The story follows Charles and Emma Bovary, focusing on their emotions and thoughts. Emma is a beautiful, educated young woman longing for romance and luxury. Her marriage with Charles Bovary was supposed to provide both,Continue reading “Reviving the classics: Madame Bovary”

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Reviving the classics: Mary Barton

Mary Barton tells a story of a young girl living in Manchester in the 1840s. It is a time of a great economic depression, and the novel is concerned with the situation of the working class. Gaskell presents in detail the horrible conditions in which the factory workers lived and appeals for understanding and compassion. TheContinue reading “Reviving the classics: Mary Barton”

Reviving the classics: Jane Eyre

‘I am not an angel, […] and I will not be one till I die: I will be myself.’[1] Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë is definitely one of my favourite books. When I read it for the first time, I was around 20-years-old, and I saw it only as a romance novel. After rereading it asContinue reading “Reviving the classics: Jane Eyre”

Reviving the classics: Northanger Abbey

‘No one who had ever seen Catherine Morland in her infancy, would have supposed her born to be an heroine’[1] Northanger Abbey by Jane Austen is characterised by the young age of the heroine. Catherine Morland is seventeen years old, making her a few years younger than Elisabeth and Jane Bennet and the same age asContinue reading “Reviving the classics: Northanger Abbey”